Privacy advocates haven’t given up the fight after the U.S. Congress voted to allow ISPs to sell customers’ browsing histories and other personal information without their permission.

On Tuesday, the House of Representatives voted 215 to 205 to strike down ISP privacy regulations approved by the Federal Communications Commission only months ago. House’s passage of a resolution of disapproval followed a Senate vote to pass the same resolution days earlier. 

President Donald Trump is expected to sign the Republican-pushed bill. But Senator Ed Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat, said he will introduce new legislation to require the FCC to pass new ISP privacy rules.

“The Republican-controlled Congress wants broadband companies to use and sell sensitive information about Americans’ health, finances, and even children, without consent,” Markey said in a statement. 

It would be difficult for a new ISP privacy bill to pass in the Republican-controlled Congress, however.

Trump’s signature on the resolution passed Tuesday would kill FCC rules requiring broadband providers to receive opt-in customer permission to share sensitive personal information, including web-browsing history, geolocation, and financial details with third parties. 

Privacy advocates say the rules are necessary to protect broadband customers, but critics say the FCC’s rules subjected ISPs to much stronger privacy regulations than web-based companies like Google and Facebook.

The FCC has limited authority to regulate other web-based companies. The ISP privacy rules, passed in October, were “designed to benefit one group of favored companies over another group of disfavored companies,” said Ajit Pai, the new FCC chairman, a Republican who opposed the regulations.



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