These days, a pricey clothes dryer can’t afford to be mediocre, and unfortunately that’s just the case with the $1,400 Whirlpool WED92HEFU. Sure, it’s attractive and offers lots of specialty cycles and steam modes. For this much money, though, it faces stiff competition from the likes of LG, Kenmore, and Electrolux.

This Whirlpool dryer runs relatively slowly compared with other machines such as the $1,100 Kenmore 69133 and $1,100 LG DLEY 1701V. Not only do these dryers process loads of wet clothes faster, they have designs that are even easier to look at. All of which make them better alternatives to the Whirlpool WED92HEFU. 

Handsome but not flashy

Like many laundry appliances, this Whirlpool dryer (model WED92HEFU) is designed to blend discreetly into its surroundings. A silver block of matte- and brushed-stainless steel, the machine won’t look out of place in either a laundry room, kitchen nook or bathroom corner. Of course, that doesn’t mean the dryer’s appearance isn’t handsome. It is, it’s just far from flashy.

With a brushed steel and chrome exterior, this dryer looks good but doesn’t stand out.


Tyler Lizenby/CNET

The dryer has attractive chrome accents that run along the drum door. Likewise, a curvy line both draws the eye and separates the door from the machine’s control panel above. 

Controls on this appliance are straightforward as well. At the center of the panel is a large dial you turn to select your intended dry cycle. There are 10 cycle options to choose from. They tackle numerous clothing and textile types, such as Bulky and Heavy Duty items along with Delicates and Casual clothing. The Normal program handles everyday garments plus loads of mixed fabrics.

In the top-left corner of the panel is a small LED display. It communicates remaining cycle time (minutes) in brightly lit digits. That makes the screen easy to read from a distance or at sharp angles.

A large dial spins through various cycle types and steam modes.

Several steam modes are on board, too. Tapping the Steam button adds a brief burst of moisture and extra time to the end of a cycle. A standalone Steam Refresh cycle runs for 22 minutes by default and functions similarly. Both programs use steam to remove odors and light wrinkles that may lurk in your dirty laundry. All the steam functions are limited to the high and medium temperature settings, so steaming delicates isn’t possible.



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