Twitter is dumping its support for Do Not Track (DNT), changing how it shares user data with third parties, and holding any web browsing data it collects for a longer duration—all to better aid in ad targeting, of course.

But at the same time, Twitter is giving users more control over what kind of user data can be used for targeted advertising, as well as more transparency about the information it collects about you.

The privacy features are active now, but the new privacy policies that dump DNT, change data sharing policies, and hold your data longer don’t come into effect until June 18. Here’s a look at what’s going on.

Checking your advertising data

If you go to the “Your Twitter data” section of your account settings, you’ll see there’s a lot of information there about your activity and how you’re being advertised to.

You can see the locations you’ve visited, which Twitter also uses for targeted advertising. There are also lists of the various interest categories that Twitter thinks suit you, and categories that third-party advertisers think you’re interested in. If you see any categories you don’t like in either section Twitter lets you dump them.

You can also request to see a list of advertisers who have categorized you into various groups, as well as see how many groups you’re in. My account, for example, is “part of 17,056 audiences from 4264 advertisers” as of this writing.

Advertising and personalization

Ian Paul/IDG

Twitter’s personalization and data settings.

In Twitter for the Web, go to Settings > Privacy and safety > Personalization and Data. Here, you can see additional check boxes regarding personalization of ads based on your information. If you like, you can leave them all active, which is the default, or you can uncheck every box and turn it all off.

The settings are fairly self-explanatory, but they include general personalization for ads, information about the apps you use on your smartphone, your location history, and websites you visit that have embedded twitter buttons or tweets.



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